Bible taught Jesus and His Disciples were thieves? Refuting A Muslim Claim


The Domain for Truth

thief

A Muslim from Nigeria tried to add me on facebook the other day.  He has been going around online as a troll attacking Christianity.  One of his charge against Jesus is that the Bible taught Jesus and His Disciples were thieves.  That is, Jesus and disciples stole things from people.  In a post titled “CAN WE CALL THIS AUTHORITY STEALING OR WHAT” this is what the individual wrote:

Mathew 12:1- King James Bible
At that time Jesus went on the
sabbath day through the corn; and his disciples were an hungered, and began to pluck the ears of corn, and to eat.

Jesus was reported to also enter a farm that belongs to someone on a Sabbath day to take corn without the knowledge of the owner.

.Bible says that when Jesus was caught plucking corn, he said, have they not read it how David went into the Synagogue on a…

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What the Green Reaction tells us about the UK Church


I have been bombarded with responses to my article on Stephen Green’s cruel mocking tweet about Tom Daley, which has clearly been read by thousands!   The Blasphemy of Christian Voice and an Apolog…

Source: What the Green Reaction tells us about the UK Church

The Ancient Roots of the ‘Prosperity Gospel’ Heresy — Zwinglius Redivivus


James Spinti has discovered that the ancient Akkadians had their own version of the ‘prosperity Gospel’! That’s right- there’s nothing new under the sun- not even the nonsense spewed by Paula White, Benny Hinn, Joel Osteen, and Oprah Winfrey! One piece of evidence that a supernatural connection empowering causative speech lies with the speech itself […]

via The Ancient Roots of the ‘Prosperity Gospel’ Heresy — Zwinglius Redivivus

Feeding the 5,000


Dr. Claude Mariottini - Professor of Old Testament

Christianity Today has a good article about the feeding of the multitude by Jesus and his disciples. Here is a short excerpt:

The story is told in told in Matthew 14:13-21, Mark 6: 30-44, Luke 9:10-17 and John 6: 5-13, and there are at least three things to say about it.

First, it revisits Old Testament stories about miraculous multiplications of food: the manna and quails provided through Moses in the wilderness, Elijah in 1 Kings 17, Elisha in 2 Kings 4. Jesus is the heir to these great men, only more so. The readers of the story would have understood exactly what was being said: Jesus didn’t come out of nowhere, he represents the culmination of God’s grace revealed in the Old Testament.

Read the article; it is titled: “Why Jesus didn’t feed the 5,000, and why it matters.”

Claude F. Mariottini
Professor of Old Testament
Northern Baptist Seminary

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3 things to keep in mind if you don’t want to screw up the Noah story — Pete Enns


There’s been quite a lot of kerfuffle online this summer in the wild and wacky, never boring, but yet always so, world of reading the Bible far, far, too literally. I should put in my two cents—be ready for a shock—that I don’t think much of the recent construction of a life-size but totally non-function…

via 3 things to keep in mind if you don’t want to screw up the Noah story — Pete Enns

Biblical Ethics Not Under the Law — My Digital Seminary


How is all of Scripture for us? Aren’t we “not under the Law”? If so, how are we to think of the moral laws in the OT that are not repeated in the New? Some argue that Christians are not under the civil and ceremonial elements of Mosaic Law but that we continue to remain…

via Biblical Ethics Not Under the Law — My Digital Seminary

Review: The Unseen Realm by Michael Heiser — My Digital Seminary


How does one even begin to review a book so profoundly impacting and paradigm-shifting? Perhaps with a personal anecdote? I used to lean towards skepticism when it comes to the supernatural. This is hardly healthy for a Christian. It’s not that I disbelieved God’s providence, Jesus’ miracles, the resurrection, or even the enduring nature of…

via Review: The Unseen Realm by Michael Heiser — My Digital Seminary

Book Review: Byzantine Naval Forces 1261 – 1461 by Raffaele D’Amato. — Adventures In Historyland


48 pages Publisher: Osprey Publishing (22 Sept. 2016) Language: English ISBN-10: 1472807286 https://www.amazon.co.uk/Byzantine-Naval-Forces-1261-1461-Men-at-Arms/dp/1472807286 One of Osprey’s newest and most prolific authors, Raffaele D’Amato, focuses this study on the three “Regiments” of Byzantine marine infantry who manned the fleets of the Eastern Roman Empire for the last 300 years of its existence. He qualifies two things, […]

via Book Review: Byzantine Naval Forces 1261 – 1461 by Raffaele D’Amato. — Adventures In Historyland

5 Reasons I Love the NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible — Jayson D. Bradley


“Are you interested in reviewing our new NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible?” Luckily, the question arrived in an email so I didn’t have to pretend to be all nonchalant in my response. I was able to reply without betraying my unnatural level of excitement. I spent 15 years working in Christian retail and my favorite moments involved helping people…

via 5 Reasons I Love the NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible — Jayson D. Bradley

Do You Have to Be Anti-Western to Be Eastern Orthodox? — Conciliar Post


TJ Humphrey’s latest article, Why I Didn’t Convert to Eastern Orthodoxy, is making the rounds on the internet as voices on social media and elsewhere join in to echo his main critique. The enthusiasm with which this article was received is indicative of a failure on our part as Eastern Orthodox Christians in general and…

via Do You Have to Be Anti-Western to Be Eastern Orthodox? — Conciliar Post

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