Recapping the Summit on Inerrancy | The Cripplegate | Nathan Busenitz


Nathan serves on the pastoral staff of Grace Church and teaches theology at The Master’s Seminary in Los Angeles.

Note: I posted this yesterday on Preachers and Preaching, the new blog of The Master’s Seminary. I’ve duplicated it here at the Cripplegate, to make sure as many people as possible know about the resources available from the Summit on Biblical Inerrancy.

It’s hard to believe the 2015 Summit on Biblical Inerrancy is over. With 16 guest speakers and 18 general sessions, it was a power-packed week celebrating our common commitment to the absolute truth of God’s Word.

In case you missed any of general sessions, you can find summaries of each session below. Videos for the sessions can be found here and also here.

In session 1, John MacArthur opened the conference by listing four reasons why a summit on biblical inerrancy is needed. Those who love God and His Word are called to defend it. Click here for a full summary.

In session 2, Alistair Begg exposited 2 Tim. 4:1-5, emphasizing the divine charge to preach the Word in the midst of a culture that does not want to hear the truth. Click here for a full summary.

In session 3, R. C. Sproul provided an apologetic argument for defending the doctrine of inerrancy when speaking to theological liberals and others who deny the absolute truth of God’s Word. Click here for a full summary.

In session 4, Stephen Nichols used 1 Thess. 2:13 to answer the question, How did we get here? He traced American history in the 19th and 20th centuries to help explain the current theological landscape. Click here for a full summary.

In session 5, Ligon Duncan addressed 2 Timothy 3:14-17. From these verses, he showed what the Bible is (plenary verbal inspiration), what the Bible is for (correction and training), and what the Bible does (by bringing salvation and sanctification). Click here for a full summary.

In session 6, Miguel Nuñez showed that the Great Commission (Matt. 28:16-20) requires an inerrant Bible. Such a monumental message needed an unshakable authority, which is what Christ gave the disciples in His Word. Click here for the full summary.

In session 7, Carl Trueman surveyed the Reformers’ commitment to the doctrine of inerrancy. He specifically focused on the views of Martin Luther, John Calvin, and Heinrich Bullinger. Click here for the full summary.

In session 8, Ian Hamilton preached John 10:22-39, focusing specifically on the phrase, “Scripture cannot be broken.” Hamilton reminded us that a true commitment to biblical inerrancy will reveal itself in a Christ-like lifestyle. Click here for the full summary.

Please read the remainder of this recap here.

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