Search The Scriptures —Study 14 — Mark 7:1-23 — Apprehended


Study 14 From The Book of Mark is: Mark 7:1-23 No-one would dispute the earnestness of the Pharisees in observing genuine historical traditions, aimed at the honouring of God. Why then should Christ use such strong language in condemning then (verse 6), and how does He show up their inconsistency? Notice in verses 21-23 that […]

via Search The Scriptures —Study 14 — Mark 7:1-23 — Apprehended

“All is well” … A Steady Faith at the Western Front — Think Gospel


J. B. Rowell enlisted in April of 1916 with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces (CEF) and was invalided home in January 1917. Here is an extract of a letter written from the Somme, 1916, just a sample of the faith and feeling of an ordinary Christian soldier thrust into the horrors of war. Faith is passing through a time…

via “All is well” … A Steady Faith at the Western Front — Think Gospel

Should I study the Bible in original Hebrew and Greek? — Christian Today


Many people who move in the gifts of teaching, exhortation and knowledge love to read the Bible for all its worth and get excited about the careful study of the Bible in its original language. Should everyone follow and read the Bible the same way?

via Should I study the Bible in original Hebrew and Greek? — Christian Today

Christ, Christianity, and Plato’s Cave — The Christian Apologetics Alliance


I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.- C. S. Lewis In Plato’s famous work The Republic, written around 380 b.C., he gives an allegory commonly known as The Cave. In this discourse he describes people who…

via Christ, Christianity, and Plato’s Cave — The Christian Apologetics Alliance

4 Part Audio Series: Foundations for Theology


Shared from The Domain for Truth, excellent piece.

This is a four part audio series on the foundations for theology that was given before exploring further the various doctrines of God.  The audios are in MP3 format and I’ve included the PDF of the outlines to follow along as well.

  1. Why Study About God?  Audios  PDF
  2. Can We Know God?         Audios  PDF
  3. How has God revealed Himself? Part 1 of 2  Audios  PDF
  4. How has God revealed Himself? Part 2 of 2  Audios  PDF

I hope and pray that God’s people would be edified.

 

Source: 4 Part Audio Series: Foundations for Theology

That One Time When Geneva Decided Any Wretch Was Welcome to the Lord’s Supper…


Shared from Zwinglius Redivivus, a snippet of this excellent piece.

During Calvin’s first stint in Geneva, he insisted that the Church alone be allowed to determine who could receive the Lord’s Supper.   Unrepentant wretches and those living in open disobedience to God were refused entry.

 

Source: That One Time When Geneva Decided Any Wretch Was Welcome to the Lord’s Supper…

What Does It Mean to Meditate on Scripture?


Shared from Logos Bible Software Blog, an snippet of this excellent piece.

 

This post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-dayCamp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

As we begin the New Year with, hopefully, a determination to be students of Scripture, I want to share one of my favorite verses with you:

This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but you shall meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it. For then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will have good success.
Joshua 1:8 (ESV)

When I memorized this verse years ago as a new Christian I focused on the word meditate, which I naturally assumed meant “get in a quiet place and think about the Word.” So I set out to apply this text to my life by pondering a little of the Bible every day. Certainly that’s a worthy and rewarding habit, but is that precisely what the Hebrew word translated meditate means?

 

Source: What Does It Mean to Meditate on Scripture?

The Slavery of Kant’s Maxim


Shared from Theologians Inc., a snippet, excellent piece!

 

Kant’s Maxim is well known in philosophy – perhaps one of the most well known maxims in philosophy, in fact. Roger Scruton calls the moral philosophy within which the maxim fits ‘one of the most beautiful creations the human mind has ever devised’, (‘Modern Philosophy’, p. 286). And yet, despite the liberating intentions of the maxim, a strong case can be made for the idea that the maxim is a slave-master more than a liberator.The maxim itself is a short one: ‘Act only on that maxim which you can will as a law for all rational beings.’ Our actions refer to reason alone, discounting any and all empirical considerations. This is how Kant derives the universal validity of his maxim such that by doing what reason demands of us we are doing something that is binding on all rational beings…

Source: The Slavery of Kant’s Maxim